English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Is There a Classical Inertial Sublayer Over the Amazon Forest?

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons211225

Sörgel,  Matthias
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons144590

Tsokankunku,  Anywhere
Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons104597

Pöhlker,  Christopher
Multiphase Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons230466

Moran-Zuloaga,  Daniel
Multiphase Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

Locator
There are no locators available
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts available
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Dias-Junior, C. Q., Dias, N. L., dos Santos, O. M. N., Sörgel, M., Araujo, A., Tsokankunku, A., et al. (2019). Is There a Classical Inertial Sublayer Over the Amazon Forest? Geophysical Research Letters, 46(10), 5614-5622. doi:10.1029/2019GL083237.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-EC73-2
Abstract
On the basis of measurements over different surfaces, an inertial sublayer (ISL), where Monin‐Obukhov Similarity Theory applies, exists above z=3h, where h is canopy height. The roughness sublayer is within h<z<3h. Most studies of the surface layer above forests, however, are able to probe only a narrow region above h. Therefore, direct verification of an ISL above tall forests is difficult. In this study we conducted a systematic analysis of unstable turbulence characteristics at heights from 40 to 325 m, measured at an 80m, and the recently built 325‐m Amazon Tall Tower Observatory towers over the Amazon forest. Our analyses have revealed no indication of the existence of an ISL; instead, the roughness sublayer directly merges with the convective mixed layer above. Implications for estimates of momentum and scalar fluxes in numerical models and observational studies can be significant.