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Retrieval Simulations of Atmospheric Gases from Herschel Observations of Titan

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Rengel,  Miriam
Department Planets and Comets, Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Max Planck Society;

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Sagawa,  Hideo
Department Planets and Comets, Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Max Planck Society;

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Hartogh,  Paul
Department Planets and Comets, Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Rengel, M., Sagawa, H., & Hartogh, P. (2010). Retrieval Simulations of Atmospheric Gases from Herschel Observations of Titan. Advances in Geosciences, 335-348. doi:10.1142/9789812838162_0026.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-EA1E-5
Abstract
The launch of the Herschel Space Observatory is scheduled for 2009 and Herschel is planned to be operational for 3.5 to 4 years. Among others, a guaranteed time key project called "Water and related chemistry in the Solar System" has successfully undergone a peer review process. This project dedicates a substantial amount of observation time for the atmospheres of the outer planets, of Enceladus, and of Titan, using all three Herschel instruments (Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared (HIFI), Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS), and Spectral and Photometric Imaging REceiver (SPIRE)). In this paper we present calculations of the expected spectra in the Herschel wavelength range and investigate the possibility to retrieve vertical profiles of temperature and H2O mixing ratio with the spectral resolution of HIFI, and temperature and H2O, HCN, and CO mixing ratios with PACS in Titan's atmosphere for the expected signal-to-noise ratios.