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Journal Article

Generation of reconfigurable optical traps for microparticles spatial manipulation through dynamic split lens inspired light structures

MPS-Authors

Turpin,  Alex
External Organizations;
Max Planck Research Group Neural Circuits, Center of Advanced European Studies and Research (caesar), Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Lizana, A., Zhang, H., Turpin, A., Van Eeckhout, A., Torres-Ruiz, F. A., Vargas, A., et al. (2018). Generation of reconfigurable optical traps for microparticles spatial manipulation through dynamic split lens inspired light structures. Scientific Reports, 8: 11263. doi:10.1038/s41598-018-29540-1.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-40ED-9
Abstract
We present an experimental method, based on the use of dynamic split-lens configurations, useful for the trapping and spatial control of microparticles through the photophoretic force. In particular, the concept of split-lens configurations is exploited to experimentally create customized and reconfigurable three-dimensional light structures, in which carbon coated glass microspheres, with sizes in a range of 63-75 μm, can be captured. The generation of light spatial structures is performed by properly addressing phase distributions corresponding to different split-lens configurations onto a spatial light modulator (SLM). The use of an SLM allows a dynamic variation of the light structures geometry just by modifying few control parameters of easy physical interpretation. We provide some examples in video format of particle trapping processes. What is more, we also perform further spatial manipulation, by controlling the spatial position of the particles in the axial direction, demonstrating the generation of reconfigurable three-dimensional photophoretic traps for microscopic manipulation of absorbing particles.