English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Simultaneous dual-plane, real-time magnetic resonance imaging of oral cavity movements in advanced trombone players.

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons15082

Frahm,  J.
Biomedical NMR Research GmbH, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons15968

Voit,  D.
Biomedical NMR Research GmbH, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons59192

Joseph,  A.
Biomedical NMR Research GmbH, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society;

External Ressource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Iltis, P. W., Heyne, M., Frahm, J., Voit, D., Joseph, A., & Atlas, L. (2019). Simultaneous dual-plane, real-time magnetic resonance imaging of oral cavity movements in advanced trombone players. Quantitative Imaging in Medicine and Surgery, 9(6), 976-984. doi:10.21037/qims.2019.05.14.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-49B9-A
Abstract
Background: This paper describes the use of real-time magnetic resonance imaging to simultaneously obtain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) videos in both a sagittal and coronal plane during the performance of a musical exercise in five advanced trombone players. Methods: Dual-slice recordings were implemented in a frame-interleaved manner with 20 ms acquisitions per frame to achieve two interleaved videos at a rate of 25 frames per second. A customized MATLAB toolkit was used for the extraction of line profiles from MRI videos to quantify tongue movements associated with exercise performance from both perspectives. Results: Across all subjects, the analyses revealed precise coupling of vertical movements of the dorsal tongue surface (DTS), viewed from a sagittal perspective, with reduction in the vertical and horizontal dimensions of the air channel formed between the DTS and the hard palate, viewed from a coronal perspective. The cross-correlation between these movements was very strong (mean R=0.967). Conclusions: These results demonstrate the unique utility of this dual-slice technology in describing the coordination of complex tongue movements occurring in two planes (i.e., three directions) simultaneously, lending a deeper understanding of lingual motor control during trombone performance.