English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Minimal group formation influences on over-imitation

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons204165

Schleihauf,  Hanna
Max Planck Research Group Early Social Cognition, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons19727

Hoehl,  Stefanie
Max Planck Research Group Early Social Cognition, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;
University Vienna, Austria;

External Ressource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Schleihauf, H., Pauen, S., & Hoehl, S. (2019). Minimal group formation influences on over-imitation. Cognitive Development, 50, 222-236. doi:10.1016/j.cogdev.2019.04.004.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-56A7-F
Abstract
This study investigated influences of group membership on preschoolers’ (N = 174) over-imitation, focusing on artificially formed minimal groups. Children observed an ingroup or outgroup model demonstrating an inefficient strategy. We tested whether group membership influenced the elicitation of over-imitation (Phase 1). Subsequently, they observed an outgroup/ingroup model demonstrating an efficient strategy and we tested whether group membership influenced the persistence of over-imitation when a more efficient solution is available (Phase 2). Although we found a significant increase in over-imitation with an increasing emphasis of group membership during group formation, over-imitation rates were not affected by group membership of the model. It did not make a difference whether children observed either strategy by an ingroup or outgroup model. We conclude that minimal group membership itself did not affect children’s tendency to over-imitate. Nevertheless, we assume that children’s over-imitation was influenced by general aspects of the group formation process, such as the playful context which was created prior to the demonstrations.