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Late Pleistocene human genome suggests a local origin for the first farmers of central Anatolia

MPS-Authors
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Feldman,  Michal
Archaeogenetics, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

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Bianco,  Raffaela A.
MHAAM, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

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Stockhammer,  Philipp W.
MHAAM, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;
Archaeogenetics, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

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Posth,  Cosimo
Archaeogenetics, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

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Haak,  Wolfgang
Archaeogenetics, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

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Jeong,  Choongwon
Archaeogenetics, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

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Krause,  Johannes
MHAAM, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;
Archaeogenetics, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Feldman, M., Fernández-Domínguez, E., Reynolds, L., Baird, D., Pearson, J., Hershkovitz, I., et al. (2019). Late Pleistocene human genome suggests a local origin for the first farmers of central Anatolia. Nature Communications, 10: 1218. doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09209-7.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-5DB1-C
Abstract
Anatolia was home to some of the earliest farming communities. It has been long debated whether a migration of farming groups introduced agriculture to central Anatolia. Here, we report the first genome-wide data from a 15,000-year-old Anatolian hunter-gatherer and from seven Anatolian and Levantine early farmers. We find high genetic continuity (~80–90%) between the hunter-gatherers and early farmers of Anatolia and detect two distinct incoming ancestries: an early Iranian/Caucasus related one and a later one linked to the ancient Levant. Finally, we observe a genetic link between southern Europe and the Near East predating 15,000 years ago. Our results suggest a limited role of human migration in the emergence of agriculture in central Anatolia.