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Population study of the filamentous sulfur bacteria Thioploca spp. off the Bay of Concepcion, Chile

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Schulz-Vogt,  Heide
Ecophysiology Group, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Jørgensen,  Bo Barker
Department of Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Schulz-Vogt, H., Strotmann, B., Gallardo, V. A., & Jørgensen, B. B. (2000). Population study of the filamentous sulfur bacteria Thioploca spp. off the Bay of Concepcion, Chile. Marine Ecology Progess Series, 200, 117-126.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-65F4-7
Abstract
A population of filamentous sulfur bacteria Thioploca spp. living in the Bay of Concep- ci6n, Chile, and the adjoining shelf area was sampled for 14 mo at 4 to 6 wk intervals to investigate the influence of seasonal variations in upwelng intensity and oxygen concentrations on the popula- tion dynamics. The Thioploca population was described by its biomass, total number and diameter of sheaths, number of trichomes and species per sheath, and abundance and depth distribution of different morphological forms, e.g. trichome diameters and ratios of cell-length to diameter. Throughout the summer of 1996, oxygen concentrations in the bottom water were near zero, nitrate as 10 to 20 pM and the biomass was high, up to 160 g m-' wet weight without sheaths. During winter, the biomass declined due to higher oxygen concentrations under reduced upwelling intensity. The depth distribution of Thioploca spp. changed strongly with seasonal variations, but the population structure remained mainly unchanged. During the 'El Nifio' event in 1998, with high oxygen and low primary production, the biomass was very low. In the Bay of Concepcion 2 populations of filamentous sulfur bacteria were observed, filaments with short cells in sheaths, populating the upper 7 cm of the sediment, and filaments without sheaths living at the sediment surface.