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Naming pictures slowly facilitates memory for their names

MPS-Authors
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Zormpa,  Eirini
Psychology of Language Department, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;
International Max Planck Research School for Language Sciences, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;

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Meyer,  Antje S.
Psychology of Language Department, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;

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Brehm,  Laurel
Psychology of Language Department, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;

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Zormpa_poster_ESCoP_2019.pdf
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Citation

Zormpa, E., Meyer, A. S., & Brehm, L. (2019). Naming pictures slowly facilitates memory for their names. Poster presented at the 21st Meeting of the European Society for Cognitive Psychology (ESCoP 2019), Tenerife, Spain.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-7830-F
Abstract
Studies on the generation effect have found that coming up with words, compared to reading them, improves memory. However, because these studies used words at both study and test, it is unclear whether generation affects visual or conceptual/lexical representations. Here, participants named pictures after hearing the picture name (no-generation condition), backward speech, or an unrelated word (easy and harder generation conditions). We ruled out effects at the visual level by testing participants’ recognition memory on the written names of the pictures that were named earlier. We also assessed the effect of processing time during generation on memory. In the recognition memory test, participants were more accurate in the generation conditions than in the no-generation condition. They were also more accurate for words that took longer to be retrieved, but only when generation was required. This work shows that generation affects conceptual/lexical representations and informs the relationship between language and memory.