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Journal Article

Theory of equidistant three-dimensional radiance measurements with optical microprobes

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Kühl,  Michael
Permanent Research Group Microsensor, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Jørgensen,  Bo Barker
Department of Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

FukshanskyKazarinova, N., Fukshansky, L., Kühl, M., & Jørgensen, B. B. (1996). Theory of equidistant three-dimensional radiance measurements with optical microprobes. Applied Optics, 35(1), 65-73. doi:10.1364/AO.35.000065.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-B3F4-E
Abstract
Fiber-optic radiance microprobes, increasingly applied for measurements of internal light fields in living tissues, provide three-dimensional radiance distribution solids and radiant energy fluence rates at different depths of turbid samples. These data are, however, distorted because of an inherent feature of optical fibers: nonuniform angular sensitivity. Because of this property a radiance microprobe during a single measurement partly underestimates light from the envisaged direction and partly senses light from other directions. A theory of three-dimensional equidistant radiance measurements has been developed that provides correction for this instrumental error using the independently obtained function of the angular sensitivity of the microprobe. For the first time, as far as we know, the measurements performed with different radiance microprobes are comparable. An example of application is presented. The limitations of this theory and the prospects for this approach are discussed.