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Journal Article

Playing a cooperative game promotes preschoolers’ sharing with third-parties, but not social inclusion

MPS-Authors
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Hardecker,  Susanne
Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society;

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Haun,  Daniel B. M.
Department of Comparative Cultural Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society;

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https://osf.io/jasbz/
(Supplementary material)

Fulltext (public)

Toppe_Playing-PLoSOne_2019.pdf
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Citation

Toppe, T., Hardecker, S., & Haun, D. B. M. (2019). Playing a cooperative game promotes preschoolers’ sharing with third-parties, but not social inclusion. PLoS One, 14(8): e0221092. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0221092.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-8899-6
Abstract
This study examined the effect of gaming context on young children’s prosocial behaviors. Dyads of 4- to 5-year-old children (N = 96) played the same game cooperatively, competitively, or solitarily. After playing the game for a total of ten minutes, sharing with and social inclusion of uninvolved third-parties as well as free play with previous co-players was observed. Children shared less with third-parties after playing the game competitively than after playing it cooperatively. Playing a solitary game resulted in intermediate levels of sharing. The structure of the game did not differentially impact measures of social inclusion or free play.