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Neuroticism, depression, and anxiety traits exacerbate the state of cognitive impairment and hippocampal vulnerability to Alzheimer's disease

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Draganski,  Bogdan
Laboratoire de Recherche en Neuroimagerie (LREN), Centre hospitalier universitaire vaudois, Lausanne, Switzerland;
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Zufferey, V., Donati, A., Popp, J., Meuli, R., Rossier, J., Frackowiak, R., et al. (2017). Neuroticism, depression, and anxiety traits exacerbate the state of cognitive impairment and hippocampal vulnerability to Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring, 7, 107-114. doi:10.1016/j.dadm.2017.05.002.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-AB29-E
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Certain personality traits are associated with higher risk of Alzheimer's disease, similar to cognitive impairment. The identification of biological markers associated with personality in mild cognitive impairment could advance the early detection of Alzheimer's disease. METHODS: We used hierarchical multivariate linear models to quantify the interaction between personality traits, state of cognitive impairment, and MRI biomarkers (gray matter brain volume, gray matter mean water diffusion) in the medial temporal lobe (MTL). RESULTS: Over and above a main effect of cognitive state, the multivariate linear model showed significant interaction between cognitive state and personality traits predicting MTL abnormality. The interaction effect was mainly driven by neuroticism and its facets (anxiety, depression, and stress) and was associated with right-left asymmetry and an anterior to posterior gradient in the MTL. DISCUSSION: Our results support the hypothesis that personality traits can alter the vulnerability and pathoplasticity of disease and therefore modulate related biomarker expression.