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X-ray kinetic studies of microtubule assembly using synchrotron radiation

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Mandelkow,  Eva-Maria
Arbeitsgruppe Zytoskelett, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;
Eckhard Mandelkow, Emeriti, Max Planck Institute for Metabolism Research, Managing Director: Jens Brüning, Max Planck Society;
Emeritus Group Biophysics, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;
Neuronal Cytoskeleton and Alzheimer's Disease, Cooperations, Center of Advanced European Studies and Research (caesar), Max Planck Society;

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Harmsen,  Arnold
Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons94203

Mandelkow,  Eckhard
Arbeitsgruppe Zytoskelett, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;
Eckhard Mandelkow, Emeriti, Max Planck Institute for Metabolism Research, Managing Director: Jens Brüning, Max Planck Society;
Emeritus Group Biophysics, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society;
Neuronal Cytoskeleton and Alzheimer's Disease, Cooperations, Center of Advanced European Studies and Research (caesar), Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Mandelkow, E.-M., Harmsen, A., Mandelkow, E., & Bordas, J. (1980). X-ray kinetic studies of microtubule assembly using synchrotron radiation. Nature, 287(5783), 595-599. doi:10.1038/287595a0.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-B689-4
Abstract
The assembly of microtubules has been investigated by time-resolved X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation. The small-angle scattering becomes visible within seconds and thus enables study of the structural transitions of the protein aggregates during assembly from their subunits in solution. The X-ray pattern at 4 °C arises from a mixture of tubulin rings, dimers and some other species. Raising the temperature to 36 °C induces the breakdown of rings, followed by the growth of microtubules. The results suggest that microtubules may be formed from tubulin oligomers smaller than rings.