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Kinship-based social inequality in Bronze Age Europe

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Mittnik,  Alissa
MHAAM, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

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Haak,  Wolfgang
PALEoRIDER, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

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Schiffels,  Stephan
Archaeogenetics, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

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Stockhammer,  Philipp W.
MHAAM, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

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Krause,  Johannes
Archaeogenetics, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Mittnik, A., Massy, K., Knipper, C., Wittenborn, F., Pfrengle, S., Carlichi-Witjes, N., et al. (2019). Kinship-based social inequality in Bronze Age Europe. Science, aax6219. doi:10.1126/science.aax6219.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-D9C2-C
Abstract
Revealing and understanding the mechanisms behind social inequality in prehistoric societies is a major challenge. By combining genome wide data, isotopic evidence as well as anthropological and archaeological data, we go beyond the dominating supra-regional approaches in archaeogenetics to shed light on the complexity of social status, inheritance rules and mobility during the Bronze Age. We apply a deep micro-regional approach and analyze genome wide data of 104 human individuals deriving from farmstead-related cemeteries from the Late Neolithic to the Middle Bronze Age in southern Germany. Our results reveal that individual households lasting several generations consisted of a high-status core family and unrelated low-status individuals, a social organization accompanied by patrilocality and female exogamy, and the stability of this system over 700 years.