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Journal Article

Roadmap on STIRAP applications

MPS-Authors

Bergmann,  Klaas
Fachbereich Physik and Landesforschungszentrum OPTIMAS, Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, D-67663 Kaiserslautern, Germany;
Division Prof. Dr. Christoph H. Keitel, MPI for Nuclear Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Pálffy,  Adriana
Division Prof. Dr. Christoph H. Keitel, MPI for Nuclear Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Keitel,  Christoph H.
Division Prof. Dr. Christoph H. Keitel, MPI for Nuclear Physics, Max Planck Society;

Fulltext (public)

1908.01611.pdf
(Preprint), 8MB

Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Bergmann, K., Nägerl, H.-C., Panda, C., Gabrielse, G., Miloglyadov, E., Quack, M., et al. (2019). Roadmap on STIRAP applications. Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics, 52: 202001. Retrieved from http://arxiv.org/abs/1908.01611.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-F1B1-3
Abstract
STIRAP (Stimulated Raman Adiabatic Passage) is a powerful laser-based method, usually involving two photons, for efficient and selective transfer of population between quantum states. A particularly interesting feature is the fact that the coupling between the initial and the final quantum states is via an intermediate state even though the lifetime of the latter can be much shorter than the interaction time with the laser radiation. Nevertheless, spontaneous emission from the intermediate state is prevented by quantum interference. Maintaining the coherence between the initial and final state throughout the transfer process is crucial. STIRAP was initially developed with applications in chemical dynamics in mind. That is why the original paper of 1990 was published in The Journal of Chemical Physics. However, as of about the year 2000, the unique capabilities of STIRAP and its robustness with respect to small variations of some experimental parameters stimulated many researchers to apply the scheme in a variety of other fields of physics. The successes of these efforts are documented in this collection of articles.