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Perceiving your hand moving: BOLD suppression in sensory cortices and the role of the cerebellum in the detection of feedback delays

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Podranski,  Kornelius
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Philipps University Marburg, Germany;
Core Facility Brain Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Philipps University Marburg, Marburg, Germany;
Department Neurophysics (Weiskopf), MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Arikan, B. E., van Kemenade, B. M., Podranski, K., Steinsträter, O., Straube, B., & Kircher, T. (2019). Perceiving your hand moving: BOLD suppression in sensory cortices and the role of the cerebellum in the detection of feedback delays. Journal of Vision, 19(14). doi:10.1167/19.14.4.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-0B72-F
Abstract
Sensory consequences of self-generated as opposed to externally-generated movements are perceived as less intense and lead to less neural activity in corresponding sensory cortices, presumably due to predictive mechanisms. Self-generated sensory inputs have been mostly studied in a single modality, using abstract feedback, with control conditions not differentiating efferent from re-afferent feedback. Here we investigated the neural processing of 1) naturalistic action-feedback associations of 2) self-generated vs. externally-generated movements, and 3) how an additional (auditory) modality influences neural processing and detection of delays. Participants executed wrist movements using a passive movement device (PMD) as they watched their movements in real time or with variable delays (0-417ms). The task was to judge whether there was a delay between the movement and its visual feedback. In the externally- generated condition, movements were induced by the PMD to disentangle efferent from re- afferent feedback. Half of the trials involved auditory beeps coupled to the onset of the visual feedback. We found reduced BOLD activity in visual, auditory, and somatosensory areas during self-generated compared with externally-generated movements, in unimodal and bimodal conditions. Anterior and posterior cerebellar areas were engaged for trials in which action- feedback delays were detected for self-generated movements. Specifically, the left cerebellar lobule IX was functionally connected with the right superior occipital gyrus. The results indicate efference copy-based predictive mechanisms specific to self-generated movements, leading to BOLD suppression in sensory areas. In addition, our results support the cerebellum’s role in the detection of temporal prediction errors during our actions and their consequences.