English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Preprint

A causal role of sensory cortices in behavioral benefits of 'learning by doing'

MPS-Authors

Mathias,  Brian
Max Planck Research Group Neural Mechanisms of Human Communication, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;
External Organizations;

/persons/resource/persons185449

Hartwigsen,  Gesa
Lise Meitner Research Group Cognition and Plasticity, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons19829

Macedonia,  Manuela
Max Planck Research Group Neural Mechanisms of Human Communication, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;
External Organizations;

/persons/resource/persons20071

von Kriegstein,  Katharina
Max Planck Research Group Neural Mechanisms of Human Communication, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

External Resource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)

Mathias_Sureth_2019.pdf
(Preprint), 2MB

Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Mathias, B., Sureth, L., Hartwigsen, G., Macedonia, M., Mayer, K. M., & von Kriegstein, K. (2019). A causal role of sensory cortices in behavioral benefits of 'learning by doing'. arXiv.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-1B62-F
Abstract
Despite a rise in the use of "learning by doing" pedagogical methods in praxis, little is known as to how these methods improve learning outcomes. Here we show that visual association cortex causally contributes to performance benefits of a learning by doing method. This finding derives from transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and a gesture-enriched foreign language (L2) vocabulary learning paradigm performed by 22 young adults. Inhibitory TMS of visual motion cortex reduced learning outcomes for abstract and concrete gesture-enriched words in comparison to sham stimulation. There were no TMS effects on words learned with pictures. These results adjudicate between opposing predictions of two neuroscientific learning theories: While reactivation-based theories predict no functional role of visual motion cortex in vocabulary learning outcomes, the current study supports the predictive coding theory view that specialized sensory cortices precipitate sensorimotor-based learning benefits.