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Journal Article

Vibrational relaxation lifetime of a physisorbed molecule at a metal surface.

MPS-Authors
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Kumar,  S.
Department of Dynamics at Surfaces, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Jiang,  H.
Department of Dynamics at Surfaces, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Kandratsenka,  A.
Department of Dynamics at Surfaces, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Schwarzer,  D.
Research Group of Reaction Dynamics, MPI for biophysical chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Wodtke,  A. M.
Department of Dynamics at Surfaces, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Fulltext (public)

3176661.pdf
(Publisher version), 473KB

Supplementary Material (public)

3176661_Suppl.pdf
(Supplementary material), 753KB

Citation

Kumar, S., Jiang, H., Schwarzer, M., Kandratsenka, A., Schwarzer, D., & Wodtke, A. M. (2019). Vibrational relaxation lifetime of a physisorbed molecule at a metal surface. Physical Review Letters, 123(15): 156101. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.123.156101.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-1E41-1
Abstract
Previous measurements of vibrational relaxation lifetimes for molecules adsorbed at metal surfaces yielded values of 1-3 ps; however, only chemisorbed molecules have been studied. We report the first measurements of the vibrational relaxation lifetime of a molecule physisorbed to a metal surface. For CO(v = 1) adsorbed on Au(111) at 35 K the vibrational lifetime of the excited stretching mode is 49 +/- 3 ps. The long lifetime seen here is likely to be a general feature of physisorption, which involves weaker electronic coupling between the adsorbate and the solid due to bonding at larger distances.