English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Higher body mass index is linked to altered hypothalamic microstructure

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons228173

Thomas,  Kevin
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;
Collaborative Research Center Obesity Mechanisms, Institute of Biochemistry, University of Leipzig, Germany;

/persons/resource/persons225526

Beyer,  Frauke
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;
Collaborative Research Center Obesity Mechanisms, Institute of Biochemistry, University of Leipzig, Germany;

Lewe,  Gesa
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons198968

Zhang,  Rui
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons226756

Schindler,  Stephanie
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Leipzig, Germany;
Department Neurophysics (Weiskopf), MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons20065

Villringer,  Arno
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;
Collaborative Research Center Obesity Mechanisms, Institute of Biochemistry, University of Leipzig, Germany;
Clinic for Cognitive Neurology, University of Leipzig, Germany;
Leipzig Research Center for Civilization Diseases (LIFE), University of Leipzig, Germany;

/persons/resource/persons128137

Witte,  A. Veronica
Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;
Collaborative Research Center Obesity Mechanisms, Institute of Biochemistry, University of Leipzig, Germany;

External Resource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)

Thomas_Beyer_2019.pdf
(Publisher version), 2MB

Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Thomas, K., Beyer, F., Lewe, G., Zhang, R., Schindler, S., Schönknecht, P., et al. (2019). Higher body mass index is linked to altered hypothalamic microstructure. Scientific Reports, 9: 17373. doi:10.1038/s41598-019-53578-4.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-4CC5-8
Abstract
Animal studies suggest that obesity-related diets induce structural changes in the hypothalamus, a key brain area involved in energy homeostasis. Whether this translates to humans is however largely unknown. Using a novel multimodal approach with manual segmentation, we here show that a higher body mass index (BMI) selectively predicted higher proton diffusivity within the hypothalamus, indicative of compromised microstructure in the underlying tissue, in a well-characterized population-based cohort (n1 = 338, 48% females, age 21–78 years, BMI 18–43 kg/m²). Results were independent from confounders and confirmed in another independent sample (n2 = 236). In addition, while hypothalamic volume was not associated with obesity, we identified a sexual dimorphism and larger hypothalamic volumes in the left compared to the right hemisphere. Using two large samples of the general population, we showed that a higher BMI specifically relates to altered microstructure in the hypothalamus, independent from confounders such as age, sex and obesity-associated co-morbidities. This points to persisting microstructural changes in a key regulatory area of energy homeostasis occurring with excessive weight. Our findings may help to better understand the pathomechanisms of obesity and other eating-related disorders.