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Journal Article

Autonomous bioluminescence imaging of single mammalian cells with the bacterial bioluminescence system.

MPS-Authors
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Gregor,  C.
Department of NanoBiophotonics, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Pape,  J. K.
Department of NanoBiophotonics, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Gwosch,  K.
Department of NanoBiophotonics, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Gilat,  T.
Department of NanoBiophotonics, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Sahl,  S. J.
Department of NanoBiophotonics, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Hell,  S. W.
Department of NanoBiophotonics, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Fulltext (public)

3180532.pdf
(Publisher version), 2MB

Supplementary Material (public)

3180532_Suppl.htm
(Supplementary material), 190KB

Citation

Gregor, C., Pape, J. K., Gwosch, K., Gilat, T., Sahl, S. J., & Hell, S. W. (2019). Autonomous bioluminescence imaging of single mammalian cells with the bacterial bioluminescence system. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 116(52), 26491-26496. doi:10.1073/pnas.1913616116.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-4F0F-4
Abstract
Bioluminescence-based imaging of living cells has become an important tool in biological and medical research. However, many bioluminescence imaging applications are limited by the requirement of an externally provided luciferin substrate and the low bioluminescence signal which restricts the sensitivity and spatiotemporal resolution. The bacterial bioluminescence system is fully genetically encodable and hence produces autonomous bioluminescence without an external luciferin, but its brightness in cell types other than bacteria has, so far, not been sufficient for imaging single cells. We coexpressed codon-optimized forms of the bacterial luxCDABE and frp genes from multiple plasmids in different mammalian cell lines. Our approach produces high luminescence levels that are comparable to firefly luciferase, thus enabling autonomous bioluminescence microscopy of mammalian cells.