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Dorsal‐movement and ventral‐form regions are functionally connected during visual‐speech recognition

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Borowiak,  Kamila
Chair of Cognitive and Clinical Neuroscience, Faculty of Psychology, TU Dresden, Germany;
Max Planck Research Group Neural Mechanisms of Human Communication, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;
Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany;

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Maguinness,  Corrina
Chair of Cognitive and Clinical Neuroscience, Faculty of Psychology, TU Dresden, Germany;
Max Planck Research Group Neural Mechanisms of Human Communication, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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von Kriegstein,  Katharina
Chair of Cognitive and Clinical Neuroscience, Faculty of Psychology, TU Dresden, Germany;
Max Planck Research Group Neural Mechanisms of Human Communication, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Borowiak, K., Maguinness, C., & von Kriegstein, K. (2019). Dorsal‐movement and ventral‐form regions are functionally connected during visual‐speech recognition. Human Brain Mapping. doi:10.1002/hbm.24852.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-57C5-B
Abstract
Faces convey social information such as emotion and speech. Facial emotion processing is supported via interactions between dorsal‐movement and ventral‐form visual cortex regions. Here, we explored, for the first time, whether similar dorsal–ventral interactions (assessed via functional connectivity), might also exist for visual‐speech processing. We then examined whether altered dorsal–ventral connectivity is observed in adults with high‐functioning autism spectrum disorder (ASD), a disorder associated with impaired visual‐speech recognition. We acquired functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data with concurrent eye tracking in pairwise matched control and ASD participants. In both groups, dorsal‐movement regions in the visual motion area 5 (V5/MT) and the temporal visual speech area (TVSA) were functionally connected to ventral‐form regions (i.e., the occipital face area [OFA] and the fusiform face area [FFA]) during the recognition of visual speech, in contrast to the recognition of face identity. Notably, parts of this functional connectivity were decreased in the ASD group compared to the controls (i.e., right V5/MT—right OFA, left TVSA—left FFA). The results confirmed our hypothesis that functional connectivity between dorsal‐movement and ventral‐form regions exists during visual‐speech processing. Its partial dysfunction in ASD might contribute to difficulties in the recognition of dynamic face information relevant for successful face‐to‐face communication.