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Beyond the darkness: recent lessons from etiolation and de-etiolation studies

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Armarego-Marriott,  T.
Organelle Biology and Biotechnology, Department Bock, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Max Planck Society;

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Sandoval-Ibanez,  O.
Organelle Biology and Biotechnology, Department Bock, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Armarego-Marriott, T., Sandoval-Ibanez, O., & Kowalewska, Ł. (2019). Beyond the darkness: recent lessons from etiolation and de-etiolation studies. Journal of Experimental Botany, 71(4), 1215-1225. doi:10.1093/jxb/erz496.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-6C45-5
Abstract
The state of etiolation is generally defined by the presence of non-green plastids (etioplasts) in plant tissues that would normally contain chloroplasts. In the commonly used dark-grown seedling system, etiolation is coupled with a type of growth called skotomorphogenesis. Upon illumination, de-etiolation occurs, marked by the transition from etioplast to chloroplast, and, at the seedling level, a switch to photomorphogenic growth. Etiolation and de-etiolation systems are therefore important for understanding both the acquisition of photosynthetic capacity during chloroplast biogenesis and plant responses to light—the most relevant signal in the life and growth of the organism. In this review, we discuss recent discoveries (within the past 2–3 years) in the field of etiolation and de-etiolation, with a particular focus on post-transcriptional processes and ultrastructural changes. We further discuss ambiguities in definitions of the term ‘etiolation’, and benefits and biases of common etiolation/de-etiolation systems. Finally, we raise several open questions and future research possibilities.