English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Paper

Gravitational-Wave Constraints on an Effective--Field-Theory Extension of General Relativity

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons192119

Sennett,  Noah
Astrophysical and Cosmological Relativity, AEI-Golm, MPI for Gravitational Physics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons221938

Brito,  Richard
Astrophysical and Cosmological Relativity, AEI-Golm, MPI for Gravitational Physics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons127862

Buonanno,  Alessandra
Astrophysical and Cosmological Relativity, AEI-Golm, MPI for Gravitational Physics, Max Planck Society;

External Ressource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)

1912.09917.pdf
(Preprint), 743KB

Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Sennett, N., Brito, R., Buonanno, A., Gorbenko, V., & Senatore, L. (in preparation). Gravitational-Wave Constraints on an Effective--Field-Theory Extension of General Relativity.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-729B-C
Abstract
Gravitational-wave observations of coalescing binary systems allow for novel tests of the strong-field regime of gravity. Using data from the Gravitational Wave Open Science Center (GWOSC) of the LIGO and Virgo detectors, we place the first constraints on an effective--field-theory based extension of General Relativity in which higher-order curvature terms are added to the Einstein-Hilbert action. We construct gravitational-wave templates describing the quasi-circular, adiabatic inspiral phase of binary black holes in this extended theory of gravity. Then, after explaining how to properly take into account the region of validity of the effective field theory when performing tests of General Relativity, we perform Bayesian model selection using the two lowest-mass binary--black-hole events reported to date by LIGO and Virgo---GW151226 and GW170608---and constrain this theory with respect to General Relativity. We find that these data can rule out the appearance of new physics on distance scales of 70-200 km. Finally, we describe a general strategy for improving constraints as more observations will become available with future detectors on the ground and in space.