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Does Data Disclosure Increase Citations? Empirical Evidence from A Natural Experiment in Leading Economics Journals

MPS-Authors

McCabe,  Mark J.
MPI for Innovation and Competition, Max Planck Society;

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Mueller-Langer,  Frank
MPI for Innovation and Competition, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

McCabe, M. J., & Mueller-Langer, F. (2019). Does Data Disclosure Increase Citations? Empirical Evidence from A Natural Experiment in Leading Economics Journals. JRC Digital Economy Working Paper, 2019-02.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-7C0F-1
Abstract
Does data disclosure have an impact on citations? Four leading economics journals introduced a data disclosure policy between 2004 and 2006. We use panel data consisting of 17,135 article citing-year observations from 1996 to 2015 for articles published in these journals. Empirical articles that did not disclose data (46% of the sample) serve as a control group. Evidence for a positive open data citation effect is weak (6% and not statistically significant). On the other hand, the citation impacts of publication are substantial and precisely estimated. Pure theory, hybrid and purely empirical articles enjoy citations benefits of 22%, 32% and 44%, respectively. Our pre- and post-publication citation data allow us to identify the citation effects of data disclosure and publication, while controlling for intrinsic article quality.