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Consequences of combining life-history traits with sex-specific differences

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Venkateswaran,  Vandana Revathi
IMPRS for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;
Research Group Theoretical Models of Eco-Evolutionary Dynamics, Department Evolutionary Theory, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Gokhale,  Chaitanya S.
Research Group Theoretical Models of Eco-Evolutionary Dynamics, Department Evolutionary Theory, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Venkateswaran, V. R., Roth, O., & Gokhale, C. S. (2020). Consequences of combining life-history traits with sex-specific differences. bioRxiv. doi:10.1101/2020.01.03.892810.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-87ED-8
Abstract
Males and females evolved distinct life-history strategies, reflected in diverse life-history traits, summarized as sexual dimorphism. Life-history traits are highly interlinked. The sex that allocates more resources towards offspring is expected to increase its life span, and this might require an efficient immune system. However, the other sex might allocate its resources towards ornamentation, and this might have immunosuppressive effects. Activity of immune response may not be specific to the sex that produces the eggs but could correlate with the amount of parental investment given. Informed by experimental data, we designed a theoretical framework that combines multiple life-history traits. We disentangled sex-biased life-history strategies from a particular sex to include species with reversed sex-roles, and male parental investment. We computed the lifetime reproductive success from the fitness components arising from diverse sex-biased life-history traits, and observed a strong bias in adult sex ratio depending on sex-specific resource allocation towards life-history traits. Overall, our work provides a generalized method to combine various life-history traits with sex-specific differences to calculate the lifetime reproductive success. This was used to explain certain empirical observations as a consequence of sexual dimorphism in life-history traits.