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Low temperature tolerance of the Antarctic species Deschampsia antarctica: a complex metabolic response associated with nutrient remobilization

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Omranian,  N.
Mathematical Modelling and Systems Biology - Nikoloski, Cooperative Research Groups, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Max Planck Society;

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Fernie,  A. R.
Central Metabolism, Department Willmitzer, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Max Planck Society;

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Nikoloski,  Z.
Mathematical Modelling and Systems Biology - Nikoloski, Cooperative Research Groups, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Max Planck Society;

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Clemente-Moreno, M., Omranian, N., Sáez, P., Figueroa, C., Del-Saz, N., Elso, M., et al. (2020). Low temperature tolerance of the Antarctic species Deschampsia antarctica: a complex metabolic response associated with nutrient remobilization. Plant, Cell and Environment, 43(6), 1376-1393. doi:10.1111/pce.13737.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-75CB-2
Abstract
ABSTRACT The species Deschampsia antarctica (DA) is one of the only two native vascular species that live in Antarctica. We performed ecophysiological, biochemical and metabolomic studies to investigate the responses of DA to low temperature. In parallel, we assessed the responses in a non-Antarctic reference species (Triticum aestivum, TA) from the same family (Poaceae). At low temperature (4°C), both species showed lower photosynthetic rates (reductions were 70 and 80% for DA and TA, respectively) and symptoms of oxidative stress, but opposite responses of antioxidant enzymes (peroxidases and catalase). We employed fused LASSO statistical modelling to associate the species-dependent physiological and antioxidant responses to primary metabolism. Model results for DA indicated associations with osmoprotection, cell wall remodelling, membrane stabilization and antioxidant secondary metabolism (synthesis of flavonols and phenylpropanoids), coordinated with nutrient mobilization from source-to-sink tissues (confirmed by elemental analysis), which were not observed in TA. The metabolic behaviour of DA, with significant changes in particular metabolites, was compared with a newly compiled multi-species dataset showing a general accumulation of metabolites in response to low temperatures. Altogether, the responses displayed by DA suggest a compromise between catabolism and maintenance of leaf functionality. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.