English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Cell architecture of the giant sulfur bacterium Achromatium oxaliferum: Extra-cytoplasmic localization of calcium carbonate bodies.

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons256588

Schorn,  Sina
Department of Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons210736

Salman-Carvalho,  Verena
HGF MPG Joint Research Group for Deep Sea Ecology & Technology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons210578

Littmann,  Sten
Department of Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

External Resource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)

Schorn_19.pdf
(Publisher version), 10MB

Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Schorn, S., Salman-Carvalho, V., Littmann, S., Ionescu, D., Grossart, H.-P., & Cypionka, H. (2020). Cell architecture of the giant sulfur bacterium Achromatium oxaliferum: Extra-cytoplasmic localization of calcium carbonate bodies. FEMS Microbiology Ecology. doi:10.1093/femsec/fiz200.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-B7E3-C
Abstract
Achromatium oxaliferum is a large sulfur bacterium easily recognized by large intracellular calcium carbonate bodies. Although these bodies often fill major parts of the cells' volume their role and specific intracellular location are unclear. In this study, we used various microscopy and staining techniques to identify the cell compartment harboring the calcium carbonate bodies. We observed that Achromatium cells often lost their calcium carbonate bodies, either naturally or induced by treatments with diluted acids, ethanol, sodium bicarbonate, and UV radiation which did not visibly affect the overall shape and motility of the cells (except for UV radiation). The water-soluble fluorescent dye fluorescein easily diffused into empty cavities remaining after calcium carbonate loss. Membranes (stained with Nile Red) formed a network stretching throughout the cell and surrounding empty or filled calcium carbonate cavities. The cytoplasm (stained with FITC and SYBR Green for nucleic acids) appeared highly condensed and showed spots of dissolved Ca2+ (stained with Fura-2). From our observations we conclude that the calcium carbonate bodies are located in the periplasm, in extra-cytoplasmic pockets of the cytoplasmic membrane and are thus kept separate from the cell's cytoplasm. This periplasmic localization of the carbonate bodies might explain their dynamic formation and release upon environmental changes.