English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Tracing population movements in ancient East Asia through the linguistics and archaeology of textile production [Review]

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons203035

Li,  Tao
Eurasia3angle, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons221764

Hudson,  Mark
Eurasia3angle, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons183239

Robbeets,  Martine
Eurasia3angle, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

External Resource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)

shh2514.pdf
(Publisher version), 493KB

Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Nelson, S., Zhushchikhovskaya, I., Li, T., Hudson, M., & Robbeets, M. (2020). Tracing population movements in ancient East Asia through the linguistics and archaeology of textile production [Review]. Evolutionary Human Sciences, 2: e5, pp. 1-20. doi:10.1017/ehs.2020.4.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-AD07-1
Abstract
Archaeolinguistics, a field which combines language reconstruction and archaeology as a source of information on human prehistory, has much to offer to deepen our understanding of the Neolithic and Bronze Age in Northeast Asia. So far, integrated comparative analyses of words and tools for textile production are completely lacking for the Northeast Asian Neolithic and Bronze Age. To remedy this situation, here we integrate linguistic and archaeological evidence of textile production, with the aim of shedding light on ancient population movements in Northeast China, the Russian Far East, Korea and Japan. We show that the transition to more sophisticated textile technology in these regions can be associated not only with the adoption of millet agriculture but also with the spread of the languages of the so-called ‘Transeurasian’ family. In this way, our research provides indirect support for the Language/Farming Dispersal Hypothesis, which posits that language expansion from the Neolithic onwards was often associated with agricultural colonization.