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Origin of the asymmetry of the wind driven halo observed in high-contrast images

MPS-Authors

Cantalloube,  F.
Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Max Planck Society and Cooperation Partners;

Por,  E. H.
Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Max Planck Society and Cooperation Partners;

Dohlen,  K.
Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Max Planck Society and Cooperation Partners;

Sauvage,  J. -F.
Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Max Planck Society and Cooperation Partners;

Vigan,  A.
Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Max Planck Society and Cooperation Partners;

Kasper,  M.
Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Max Planck Society and Cooperation Partners;

Bharmal,  N.
Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Max Planck Society and Cooperation Partners;

Henning,  T.
Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Max Planck Society and Cooperation Partners;

Brandner,  W.
Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Max Planck Society and Cooperation Partners;

Milli,  J.
Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Max Planck Society and Cooperation Partners;

Correia,  C.
Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Max Planck Society and Cooperation Partners;

Fusco,  T.
Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Max Planck Society and Cooperation Partners;

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Citation

Cantalloube, F., Por, E. H., Dohlen, K., Sauvage, J.-.-F., Vigan, A., Kasper, M., et al. (2018). Origin of the asymmetry of the wind driven halo observed in high-contrast images. Astronomy and Astrophysics, 620.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-CE92-E
Abstract
The latest generation of high-contrast instruments dedicated to exoplanets and circumstellar disk imaging are equipped with extreme adaptive optics and coronagraphs to reach contrasts of up to 10-4 at a few tenths of arcseconds in the near-infrared. The resulting image shows faint features, only revealed with this combination, such as the wind driven halo. The wind driven halo is due to the lag between the adaptive optics correction and the turbulence speed over the telescope pupil. However, we observe an asymmetry of this wind driven halo that was not expected when the instrument was designed. In this letter, we describe and demonstrate the physical origin of this asymmetry and support our explanation by simulating the asymmetry with an end-to-end approach. From this work, we find that the observed asymmetry is explained by the interference between the AO-lag error and scintillation effects, mainly originating from the fast jet stream layer located at about 12 km in altitude. Now identified and interpreted, this effect can be taken into account for further design of high-contrast imaging simulators, next generation or upgrade of high-contrast instruments, predictive control algorithms for adaptive optics, or image post-processing techniques.