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Journal Article

Biopearling of Interconnected Outer Membrane Vesicle Chains by a Marine Flavobacterium

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Fischer,  Tanja
Department of Microbiology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Reintjes,  Greta
Department of Molecular Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Littmann,  Sten
Department of Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Harder,  Jens
Department of Microbiology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Fischer, T., Schorb, M., Reintjes, G., Kolovou, A., Santarella-Mellwig, R., Markert, S., et al. (2019). Biopearling of Interconnected Outer Membrane Vesicle Chains by a Marine Flavobacterium. Applied and Environmental Microbiology.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-FA1F-0
Abstract
Large surface-to-volume ratios provide optimal nutrient uptake conditions for small microorganisms in oligotrophic habitats. The surface area can be increased with appendages. Here, we describe chains of interconnecting vesicles protruding from cells of strain Hel3_A1_48, affiliating with Formosa spp. within the Flavobacteriia and originating from coastal free-living bacterioplankton. The chains were up to 10 μm long and had vesicles emanating from the outer membrane with a single membrane and a size of 80 to 100 nm by 50 to 80 nm. Cells extruded membrane tubes in the exponential phase, whereas vesicle chains dominated on cells in the stationary growth phase. This formation is known as pearling, a physical morphogenic process in which membrane tubes protrude from liposomes and transform into chains of interconnected vesicles. Proteomes of whole-cell membranes and of detached vesicles were dominated by outer membrane proteins, including the type IX secretion system and surface-attached peptidases, glycoside hydrolases, and endonucleases. Fluorescein-labeled laminarin stained the cells and the vesicle chains. Thus, the appendages provide binding domains and degradative enzymes on their surfaces and probably storage volume in the vesicle lumen. Both may contribute to the high abundance of these Formosa-affiliated bacteria during laminarin utilization shortly after spring algal blooms.