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Journal Article

Quantum biology revisited

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons136084

Duan,  H.-G.
Miller Group, Atomically Resolved Dynamics Department, Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Max Planck Society;
I. Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Hamburg;
The Hamburg Centre for Ultrafast Imaging, Universität Hamburg;

/persons/resource/persons136024

Miller,  R. J. D.
Miller Group, Atomically Resolved Dynamics Department, Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Max Planck Society;
The Hamburg Centre for Ultrafast Imaging, Universität Hamburg;
Departments of Chemistry and Physics, University of Toronto;

/persons/resource/persons136034

Prokhorenko,  V.
Miller Group, Atomically Resolved Dynamics Department, Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Max Planck Society;

External Resource
Fulltext (public)

eaaz4888.full.pdf
(Publisher version), 2MB

Supplementary Material (public)

suppl.zip
(Supplementary material), 12MB

Citation

Cao, J., Cogdell, R. J., Coker, D. F., Duan, H.-G., Hauer, J., Kleinekathöfer, U., et al. (2020). Quantum biology revisited. Science Advances, 6(14): eaaz4888. doi:10.1126/sciadv.aaz4888.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-067B-A
Abstract
Photosynthesis is a highly optimized process from which valuable lessons can be learned about the operating principles in nature. Its primary steps involve energy transport operating near theoretical quantum limits in efficiency. Recently, extensive research was motivated by the hypothesis that nature used quantum coherences to direct energy transfer. This body of work, a cornerstone for the field of quantum biology, rests on the interpretation of small-amplitude oscillations in two-dimensional electronic spectra of photosynthetic complexes. This Review discusses recent work reexamining these claims and demonstrates that interexciton coherences are too short lived to have any functional significance in photosynthetic energy transfer. Instead, the observed long-lived coherences originate from impulsively excited vibrations, generally observed in femtosecond spectroscopy. These efforts, collectively, lead to a more detailed understanding of the quantum aspects of dissipation. Nature, rather than trying to avoid dissipation, exploits it via engineering of exciton-bath interaction to create efficient energy flow.