English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Light-induced changes in extracellular calcium concentration in the compound eye of Calliphora, Locusta and Apis

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons246583

Sandler,  C
Former Department Comparative Neurobiology, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons84015

Kirschfeld,  K
Former Department Comparative Neurobiology, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

Fulltext (restricted access)
There are currently no full texts shared for your IP range.
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Sandler, C., & Kirschfeld, K. (1992). Light-induced changes in extracellular calcium concentration in the compound eye of Calliphora, Locusta and Apis. Journal of Comparative Physiology A, 171(5), 573-581. doi:10.1007/BF0019410.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-0BE4-D
Abstract
Ion-selective microelectrodes inserted into the compound eyes of Calliphora, Locusta and Apis were used to monitor the changes in extracellular concentration of Ca2+ (Cao) brought about by a 1-min exposure to white light (maximal luminous intensity ca. 103 cd/m2).

In the blowfly retina such stimulation causes a decrease in Cao. At high light intensities the Cao signal is phasic, falling over about 6 s to a transient light-induced minimum (ΔCao= -6.2% ± 0.4%, n = 20, SE) and then rising to an approximately stable plateau (-3.3% ± 0.6%). In migratory locusts the light-induced minimum corresponds to a ΔCao of -13.8% ± 1.6% (n = 10), and at the plateau the Cao decrease is-13.2% ± 1.5%. In honey-bees Cao at first decreases only slightly, by -2.6% ± 1.0% (n = 10); by the end of the 1-min stimulus the extracellular concentration averages 33.6% ± 14.6% above the dark level.

The results suggest a relationship between the position of the characteristic curve of the photoreceptor in the dark-adapted state, the occurrence of quantum bumps, and light-induced increases or decreases in Cao. Therefore the species differences might be interpreted as a consequence of differences in the intracellular dark concentration of Ca2+.