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Semimetallic molecular hydrogen at pressure above 350 GPa

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Eremets,  Mikhail I.
High Pressure Group, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Drozdov,  Alexander P.
High Pressure Group, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Kong,  Panpan
High Pressure Group, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Wang,  Hongbo
High Pressure Group, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Eremets, M. I., Drozdov, A. P., Kong, P., & Wang, H. (2019). Semimetallic molecular hydrogen at pressure above 350 GPa. Nature Physics, 15(12), 1246-1249. doi:10.1038/s41567-019-0646-x.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-10BB-5
Abstract
According to theoretical predictions, insulating molecular hydrogen dissociates and transforms into an atomic metal at pressures P≈ 370-500 GPa (refs.1,2,3). In another scenario, the metallization first occurs in the 250-500 GPa pressure range in molecular hydrogen through overlapping of electronic bands4,5,6,7. The calculations are not accurate enough to predict which option is realized. Here, we show that at a pressure of 350-360 GPa and temperatures <200 K, the hydrogen starts to conduct, and that the temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity is typical of a semimetal. The conductivity, measured up to 440 GPa, increases strongly with pressure. Raman spectra, measured up to 480 GPa, indicate that hydrogen remains a molecular solid at pressures up to 440 GPa, while at higher pressures the Raman signal vanishes, probably indicating further transformation to a good molecular metal or to an atomic state.