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Neuroanatomical Mapping of Visually Induced Nervous Activity in Insects by 3H-Deoxyglucose

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Buchner,  E
Former Department Neurophysiology of Insect Behavior, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Buchner,  S
Former Department Neurophysiology of Insect Behavior, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Buchner, E., & Buchner, S. (1984). Neuroanatomical Mapping of Visually Induced Nervous Activity in Insects by 3H-Deoxyglucose. In M. Ali (Ed.), Photoreception and Vision in Invertebrates (pp. 623-634). New York, NY, USA: Plenum Press.


Cite as: https://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-50B2-6
Abstract
hysiological nervous activity can be visualized post mortem in neuroanatomical sections by the radioactive deoxyglucose technique. The visual system of flies Drosophila melanogaster and Musca domestica has been investigated by this method. By applying visual stimuli consisting of homogeneous flicker or striped patterns moving in a particular direction across the retina, movement-specific and direction-specific nervous activity has been localized in autoradiographs of semi-thin sections of Drosophila brains. Several layers in the second neuropil (medulla) respond to visual movement by enhanced uptake of radioactivity. Although directional specificity in these layers has not yet been detected by light microscopy, the corresponding nervous activity cannot simply be of the on-off type since visual flicker is considerably less effective. In the posterior part of the third visual neuropil (lobula plate) four layers can be identified, each of which responds to one particular spatial direction of movement, front-to-back, back-to-front, upward or downward. Similar direction-specific movement-sensitive labeling is found in the visual system of Musca where in addition axons and dendritic arborizations of individual labeled cells are clearly resolved. The relation of these findings to electrophysiological data on dipteran flies is discussed.