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Journal Article

Frequency-Dependent Squeezed Vacuum Source for Broadband Quantum Noise Reduction in Advanced Gravitational-Wave Detectors

MPS-Authors
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Lück,  Harald
Laser Interferometry & Gravitational Wave Astronomy, AEI-Hannover, MPI for Gravitational Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Vahlbruch,  Henning
Laser Interferometry & Gravitational Wave Astronomy, AEI-Hannover, MPI for Gravitational Physics, Max Planck Society;

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2003.10672.pdf
(Preprint), 1005KB

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Citation

Zhao, Y., Aritomi, N., Capocasa, E., Leonardi, M., Eisenmann, M., Guo, Y., et al. (2020). Frequency-Dependent Squeezed Vacuum Source for Broadband Quantum Noise Reduction in Advanced Gravitational-Wave Detectors. Physical Review Letters, 124: 171101. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.124.171101.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-6321-5
Abstract
The astrophysical reach of current and future ground-based gravitational-wave detectors is mostly limited by quantum noise, induced by vacuum fluctuations entering the detector output port. The replacement of this ordinary vacuum field with a squeezed vacuum field has proven to be an effective strategy to mitigate such quantum noise and it is currently used in advanced detectors. However, current squeezing cannot improve the noise across the whole spectrum because of the Heisenberg uncertainty principle: when shot noise at high frequencies is reduced, radiation pressure at low frequencies is increased. A broadband quantum noise reduction is possible by using a more complex squeezing source, obtained by reflecting the squeezed vacuum off a Fabry-Perot cavity, known as filter cavity. Here we report the first demonstration of a frequency-dependent squeezed vacuum source able to reduce quantum noise of advanced gravitational-wave detectors in their whole observation bandwidth. The experiment uses a suspended 300-m-long filter cavity, similar to the one planned for KAGRA, Advanced Virgo and Advanced LIGO, and capable of inducing a rotation of the squeezing ellipse below 100 Hz.