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Metabolic adaptations of tissue-resident immune cells

MPS-Authors

Caputa,  George
Department Immunometabolism, Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics, Max Planck Society;

Castoldi,  Angela
Department Immunometabolism, Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics, Max Planck Society;

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Pearce,  Edward J.
Department Immunometabolism, Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics, Max Planck Society;

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Caputa, G., Castoldi, A., & Pearce, E. J. (2019). Metabolic adaptations of tissue-resident immune cells. Nature Immunology, 20, 793-801. doi:10.1038/s41590-019-0407-0.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0008-8322-D
Abstract
Unlike other cells in the body, immune cells have to be able to enter and adapt to life within diverse tissues. Immune cells develop within dedicated immune system organs, such as the bone marrow, thymus and lymphoid tissues, but also inhabit other tissues, wherein they not only provide defense against infection and malignancies but also contribute to homeostatic tissue function. Because different tissues have widely divergent metabolic rates and fuel requirements, this raises interesting questions about the adaptation of immune cells in specific tissues. When immune cells take up residence in different tissues, they develop a transcriptional signature that reflects adaptation to life and function within that tissue. Genes encoding metabolic-pathway proteins are strongly represented within these signatures, reflective of the importance of metabolic adaptation to tissue residence. In this Review, we discuss the available data on the metabolic adaptation of immune cells to life in different tissue sites, within the broader framework of how functional adaptation versus maladaptation in the niche can affect tissue homeostasis.