English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Total synthesis of polysaccharides by automated glycan assembly

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons247594

Joseph,  Abragam A. S.
Peter H. Seeberger - Automated Systems, Biomolekulare Systeme, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons220606

Pardo-Vargas,  Alonso
Peter H. Seeberger - Automated Systems, Biomolekulare Systeme, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons121849

Seeberger,  Peter H.
Peter H. Seeberger - Automated Systems, Biomolekulare Systeme, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society;

External Resource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)

Article.pdf
(Publisher version), 2MB

Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Joseph, A. A. S., Pardo-Vargas, A., & Seeberger, P. H. (2020). Total synthesis of polysaccharides by automated glycan assembly. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 142(19), 8561-8564. doi:10.1021/jacs.0c00751.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-6C7D-6
Abstract
Polysaccharides are the most abundant biopolymers on earth that serve various structural and modulatory functions. Pure, completely defined linear and branched polysaccharides are essential to understand carbohydrate structure and function. Polysaccharide isolation provides heterogeneous mixtures, while heroic efforts were required to complete chemical and/or enzymatic syntheses of polysaccharides as long 92-mers. Here, we show that automated glycan assembly (AGA) enables access to a 100-mer polysaccharide via a 201-step synthesis within 188 h. Convergent block coupling of 30- and 31-mer oligosaccharide fragments, prepared by AGA, yielded a multiple-branched 151-mer polymannoside. Quick access to polysaccharides provides the basis for future material science applications of carbohydrates.