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Cerebellar Neurodynamics Predict Decision Timing and Outcome on the Single-Trial Level

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Li,  JM
Research Group Systems Neuroscience & Neuroengineering, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Robson,  DN
Research Group Systems Neuroscience & Neuroengineering, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Lin, Q., Manley, J., Helmreich, M., Schlumm, F., Li, J., Robson, D., et al. (2020). Cerebellar Neurodynamics Predict Decision Timing and Outcome on the Single-Trial Level. Cell, 180(3), 536-551. doi:10.1016/j.cell.2019.12.018.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-6B9A-5
Abstract
Goal-directed behavior requires the interaction of multiple brain regions. How these regions and their interactions with brain-wide activity drive action selection is less understood. We have investigated this question by combining whole-brain volumetric calcium imaging using light-field microscopy and an operant-conditioning task in larval zebrafish. We find global, recurring dynamics of brain states to exhibit pre-motor bifurcations toward mutually exclusive decision outcomes. These dynamics arise from a distributed network displaying trial-by-trial functional connectivity changes, especially between cerebellum and habenula, which correlate with decision outcome. Within this network the cerebellum shows particularly strong and predictive pre-motor activity (>10 s before movement initiation), mainly within the granule cells. Turn directions are determined by the difference neuroactivity between the ipsilateral and contralateral hemispheres, while the rate of bi-hemispheric population ramping quantitatively predicts decision time on the trial-by-trial level. Our results highlight a cognitive role of the cerebellum and its importance in motor planning.