English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Eye Glow in the Moth and Superposition Theory

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons246801

Kunze,  P
Former Department Information Processing in Insects, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

External Ressource
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts stored in PuRe
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Kunze, P. (1969). Eye Glow in the Moth and Superposition Theory. Nature, 223(5211), 1172-1174. doi:10.1038/2231172a0.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-8D8C-E
Abstract
Exner's theory of the formation of a retinal image by superposition1 in certain arthropod compound eyes requires that an object in front of a number of ommatidia is twice inverted by the dioptric system of each ommatidium. Thus erect images of the object are formed behind the crystalline cones. Converging proximally, those images grow in size and superimpose in the layer of the receptive structures, the rhabdoms. Exner tested his theory by observing the image formation in sectioned eyes and found agreement between experiment and theory in more than a dozen insect species. His findings were confirmed repeatedly using the firefly2–4. (Although Exner proposed the formation of superposition images in certain Crustacean eyes, he failed to obtain upright and superposition images. So did other observers2,3. Crustacea will therefore be excluded.)