English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Extracellular vesicle isolation and characterization from periprosthetic joint synovial fluid in revision total joint arthroplasty

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons182739

Irsen,  Stephan
Electron Microscopy and Analytics, Center of Advanced European Studies and Research (caesar), Max Planck Society;

External Resource
Fulltext (public)

jcm-09-00516-v2.pdf
(Publisher version), 2MB

Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Ruewald, J. M., Randau, T. M., Hilgers, C., Masson, W., Irsen, S., Eymael, R. L., et al. (2020). Extracellular vesicle isolation and characterization from periprosthetic joint synovial fluid in revision total joint arthroplasty. Journal of Clinical Medicine, 9(2): 516. doi:10.3390/jcm9020516.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-CFE5-F
Abstract
Extracellular vesicles (EVs) comprise an as yet insufficiently investigated intercellular communication pathway in the field of revision total joint arthroplasty (RTJA). This study examined whether periprosthetic joint synovial fluid contains EVs, developed a protocol for their isolation and characterized them with respect to quantity, size, surface markers as well as documented their differences between aseptic implant failure (AIF) and periprosthetic joint infection (PJI). EV isolation was accomplished using ultracentrifugation, electron microscopy (EM) and nanoparticle tracking analysis evaluated EV presence as well as particle size and quantity. EV surface markers were studied by a bead-based multiplex analysis. Using our protocol, EM confirmed the presence of EVs in periprosthetic joint synovial fluid. Higher EV particle concentrations and decreased particle sizes were apparent for PJI. Multiplex analysis confirmed EV-typical surface epitopes and revealed upregulated CD44 and HLA-DR/DP/DQ for AIF, as well as increased CD40 and CD105. Our protocol achieved isolation of EVs from periprosthetic joint synovial fluid, confirmed by EM and multiplex analysis. Characterization was documented with respect to size, concentration and epitope surface signature. Our results indicate various differences between PJI and AIF EVs. This pilot study enables new research approaches and rising diagnostic opportunities in the field of RTJA.