English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

CO2-Fixation Strategies in Energy Extremophiles: What Can We Learn From Acetogens?

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons256577

Lemaire,  Olivier N.
Research Group Microbial Metabolism, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons256580

Jespersen,  Marion
Research Group Microbial Metabolism, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons256582

Wagner,  Tristan
Research Group Microbial Metabolism, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Max Planck Society;

External Ressource
No external resources are shared
Fulltext (public)

Lemaire20.pdf
(Publisher version), 3MB

Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Lemaire, O. N., Jespersen, M., & Wagner, T. (2020). CO2-Fixation Strategies in Energy Extremophiles: What Can We Learn From Acetogens? Frontiers in Microbiology, 11: 486. doi:10.3389/fmicb.2020.00486.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-E1D4-B
Abstract
Domestication of CO2-fixation became a worldwide priority enhanced by the will to convert this greenhouse gas into fuels and valuable chemicals. Because of its high stability, CO2-activation/fixation represents a true challenge for chemists. Autotrophic microbial communities, however, perform these reactions under standard temperature and pressure. Recent discoveries shine light on autotrophic acetogenic bacteria and hydrogenotrophic methanogens, as these anaerobes use a particularly efficient CO2-capture system to fulfill their carbon and energy needs. While other autotrophs assimilate CO2 via carboxylation followed by a reduction, acetogens and methanogens do the opposite. They first generate formate and CO by CO2-reduction, which are subsequently fixed to funnel the carbon toward their central metabolism. Yet their CO2-reduction pathways, with acetate or methane as end-products, constrain them to thrive at the "thermodynamic limits of Life". Despite this energy restriction acetogens and methanogens are growing at unexpected fast rates. To overcome the thermodynamic barrier of CO2-reduction they apply different ingenious chemical tricks such as the use of flavin-based electron-bifurcation or coupled reactions. This mini-review summarizes the current knowledge gathered on the CO2-fixation strategies among acetogens. While extensive biochemical characterization of the acetogenic formate-generating machineries has been done, there is no structural data available. Based on their shared mechanistic similarities, we apply the structural information obtained from hydrogenotrophic methanogens to highlight common features, as well as the specific differences of their CO2-fixation systems. We discuss the consequences of their CO2-reduction strategies on the evolution of Life, their wide distribution and their impact in biotechnological applications.