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Ultrahigh-speed imaging of rotational diffusion on a lipid bilayer

MPS-Authors

Mazaheri,  Mahdi
Sandoghdar Division, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;

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Shkarin,  Alexey
Sandoghdar Division, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;

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Zaburdaev,  Vasily
Max-Planck-Zentrum für Physik und Medizin, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;

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Sandoghdar,  Vahid
Sandoghdar Division, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;
Max-Planck-Zentrum für Physik und Medizin, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Mazaheri, M., Ehrig, J., Shkarin, A., Zaburdaev, V., & Sandoghdar, V. (2020). Ultrahigh-speed imaging of rotational diffusion on a lipid bilayer. Nano Letters, 20. doi:10.1021/acs.nanolett.0c02516.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-C25B-9
Abstract
We studied the rotational and translational diffusion of a single gold nanorod linked to a supported lipid bilayer with ultrahigh temporal resolution of two microseconds. By using a home-built polarization-sensitive dark-field microscope, we recorded particle trajectories with lateral precision of three nanometers and rotational precision of four degrees. The large number of trajectory points in our measurements allows us to characterize the statistics of rotational diffusion with unprecedented detail. Our data show apparent signatures of anomalous diffusion such as sublinear scaling of the mean-squared angular displacement and negative values of angular correlation function at small lag times. However, a careful analysis reveals that these effect stem from the residual noise contributions and confirms normal diffusion. Our experimental approach and observations can be extended to investigate diffusive processes of anisotropic nanoparticles in other fundamental systems such as cellular membranes or other two-dimensional fluids.