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Mapping the brain-wide network effects by optogenetic activation of the corpus callosum with an MRI-guided robotic arm

MPS-Authors
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Chen,  Y
Research Group Translational Neuroimaging and Neural Control, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons214934

Sobczak,  F
Research Group Translational Neuroimaging and Neural Control, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons214931

Pais Roldán,  P
Research Group Translational Neuroimaging and Neural Control, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons133486

Yu,  X
Research Group Translational Neuroimaging and Neural Control, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Chen, Y., Sobczak, F., Pais Roldán, P., Schwarz, C., Koretsky, A., & Yu, X. (2020). Mapping the brain-wide network effects by optogenetic activation of the corpus callosum with an MRI-guided robotic arm. Poster presented at 2020 ISMRM & SMRT Virtual Conference & Exhibition.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-D892-1
Abstract
This study not only specifies the optogenetically driven corpus callosum-mediated regulation of the local excitation/inhibition balance in the local barrel cortex, but also depicts the power of the multi-modal fMRI to characterize the brain-wide network activity associated with circuit-specific optogenetic activations. It highlights a vital aspect of the brain-wide activation for circuit-specific causality studies with optogenetic tools.