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Ultrafast dynamics of hot electrons and holes in copper: Excitation, energy relaxation, and transport effects

MPS-Authors
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Knoesel,  Ernst
Physical Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Hotzel,  Arthur
Physical Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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Wolf,  Martin
Physical Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute, Max Planck Society;

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PhysRevB.57.12812.pdf
(Publisher version), 235KB

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Citation

Knoesel, E., Hotzel, A., & Wolf, M. (1998). Ultrafast dynamics of hot electrons and holes in copper: Excitation, energy relaxation, and transport effects. Physical Review B, 57(20), 12812-12824. doi:10.1103/PhysRevB.57.12812.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-DAD8-1
Abstract
Time-resolved two-photon photoemission (2PPE) at various photon energies is used to investigate the relaxation dynamics of hot electrons in Cu(111), applying auto- and cross-correlation techniques. The relaxation times vary from 250 fs at 0.1 eV above the Fermi level to 20 fs at 2 eV and show a strong wavelength dependence in the vicinity of the d-band feature in the 2PPE spectra. Electrons not directly excited from the d band exhibit a much longer relaxation time than d-band electrons excited to the same intermediate-state energy. We attribute these apparently longer lifetimes to a delayed electron generation via Auger decay of d-band holes. Based on a band structure calculation, a simulation of the ballistic transport effect and its implication on the observed electron relaxation dynamics is presented for the three low-index copper surfaces. These observations suggest that d-band holes have a substantially longer lifetime than excited sp-band electrons of the corresponding excitation energy.