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Structural, photocatalytic and electroconductive properties of bismuth-substituted CaMoO4

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Tarakina,  Nadezda V.
Nadezda V. Tarakina, Kolloidchemie, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society;

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Piankova,  Diana V.
Nadezda V. Tarakina, Kolloidchemie, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Mikhaylovskaya, Z. A., Abrahams, I., Petrova, S. A., Buyanova, E., Tarakina, N. V., Piankova, D. V., et al. (2020). Structural, photocatalytic and electroconductive properties of bismuth-substituted CaMoO4. Journal of Solid State Chemistry, 291: 121627. doi:10.1016/j.jssc.2020.121627.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-F223-1
Abstract
The Ca1−3xBi2xФxMoO4 system (0.025 ≤ x ≤ 0.30, where Ф represents cation vacancies) was synthesized and studied. The 0.025 = x ≤ 0.15 compositions show a tetragonal defect scheelite structure. Powder X-ray and neutron diffraction patterns for compositions with 0.15 < x ≤ 0.225 exhibit a tetragonal supercell with asup ≈ √5a, csup ≈ c where a and c are the tetragonal scheelite cell parameters. Transmission electron microscopy shows that Ca0.4Bi0.4MoO4, crystals consist of three crystallographic domains: (1) defect scheelite; (2) tetragonal superlattice and (3) incommensurately modulated. Photocatalytic properties were studied using Rhodamine B water solutions under UV light. Catalytic activity increases with increasing Bi content. The conductivity of 0.15 < x ≤ 0.225 compositions is 10−7 to 10−8 S cm−1 in the range 500–650 °C, while compositions in the range 0.025 = x ≤ 0.15 show conductivity values from 10−3 to 10−8 S cm−1 from 500 to 800 °C.