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Predicting frequency changes of global-scale solar Rossby modes due to solar cycle changes in internal rotation

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Goddard,  Christopher
Department Solar and Stellar Interiors, Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Max Planck Society;

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Birch,  Aaron
Department Solar and Stellar Interiors, Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Max Planck Society;

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Fournier,  Damien
Department Solar and Stellar Interiors, Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Max Planck Society;

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Gizon,  Laurent
Department Solar and Stellar Interiors, Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Goddard, C., Birch, A., Fournier, D., & Gizon, L. (2020). Predicting frequency changes of global-scale solar Rossby modes due to solar cycle changes in internal rotation. Astronomy and Astrophysics, 640: L10. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/202038539.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-F99D-1
Abstract
Context. Large-scale equatorial Rossby modes have been observed on the Sun over the last two solar cycles. Aims. We investigate the impact of the time-varying zonal flows on the frequencies of Rossby modes. Methods. A first-order perturbation theory approach is used to obtain an expression for the expected shift in the mode frequencies due to perturbations in the internal rotation rate. Results. Using the time-varying rotation from helioseismic inversions we predict the changes in Rossby mode frequencies with azimuthal orders from m = 1 to m = 15 over the last two solar cycles. The peak-to-peak frequency change is less than 1 nHz for the m = 1 mode, grows with m, and reaches 25 nHz for m = 15. Conclusions. Given the observational uncertainties on mode frequencies due to the finite mode lifetimes, we find that the predicted frequency shifts are near the limit of detectability.