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Effects and non-effects of late language exposure on spatial language development: Evidence from deaf adults and children

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Karadöller,  Dilay Z.
Multimodal Language and Cognition, Radboud University Nijmegen, External Organizations;
International Max Planck Research School for Language Sciences, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;
Other Research, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;
Center for Language Studies, External Organizations;

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Sumer,  Beyza
Multimodal Language and Cognition, Radboud University Nijmegen, External Organizations;
Other Research, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;
Center for Language Studies, External Organizations;
University of Amsterdam;

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Ozyurek,  Asli
Multimodal Language and Cognition, Radboud University Nijmegen, External Organizations;
Research Associates, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;
Center for Language Studies, External Organizations;
Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, External Organizations;

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Citation

Karadöller, D. Z., Sumer, B., & Ozyurek, A. (2021). Effects and non-effects of late language exposure on spatial language development: Evidence from deaf adults and children. Language Learning and Development, 17(1), 1-25. doi:10.1080/15475441.2020.1823846.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-F994-A
Abstract
Late exposure to the first language, as in the case of deaf children with hearing parents, hinders the production of linguistic expressions, even in adulthood. Less is known about the development of language soon after language exposure and if late exposure hinders all domains of language in children and adults. We compared late signing adults and children (MAge = 8;5) 2 years after exposure to sign language, to their age-matched native signing peers in expressions of two types of locative relations that are acquired in certain cognitive-developmental order: view-independent (IN-ON-UNDER) and view-dependent (LEFT-RIGHT). Late signing children and adults differed from native signers in their use of linguistic devices for view-dependent relations but not for view-independent relations. These effects were also modulated by the morphological complexity. Hindering effects of late language exposure on the development of language in children and adults are not absolute but are modulated by cognitive and linguistic complexity.