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Resonant laser excitation and time-domain imaging of chiral topological polariton edge states

MPS-Authors
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Hofmann,  D.
International Max Planck Research School for Ultrafast Imaging & Structural Dynamics (IMPRS-UFAST), Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Max Planck Society;
TheoreticalDescription of Pump-Probe Spectroscopies in Solids, Theory Department, Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Max Planck Society;

Sentef,  M.
TheoreticalDescription of Pump-Probe Spectroscopies in Solids, Theory Department, Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Max Planck Society;
Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Bremen;

Fulltext (public)

PhysRevResearch.2.033386.pdf
(Publisher version), 995KB

Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Hofmann, D., & Sentef, M. (2020). Resonant laser excitation and time-domain imaging of chiral topological polariton edge states. Physical Review Research, 2(3): 033386. doi:10.1103/PhysRevResearch.2.033386.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-FC48-E
Abstract
We investigate the dynamics of chiral edge states in topological polariton systems under laser driving. Using a model system comprised of topolgically trivial excitons and photons with a chiral coupling proposed by Karzig et al. [Phys. Rev. X 5, 031001 (2015)], we investigate the real-time dynamics of a lattice version of this model driven by a laser pulse. By analyzing the time- and momentum-resolved spectral function, measured by time- and angle-resolved photoluminescence in analogy with time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy in electronic systems, we find that polaritonic states in a ribbon geometry are selectively excited via their resonance with the pump laser photon frequency. This selective excitation mechanism is independent of the necessity of strong laser pumping and polariton condensation. Our work highlights the potential of time-resolved spectroscopy as a complementary tool to real-space imaging for the investigation of topological edge state engineering in devices.