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Heterogeneity of the osteocyte lacuno-canalicular network architecture and material characteristics across different tissue types in healing bone

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Schemenz,  Victoria
Richard Weinkamer, Biomaterialien, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society;

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Gjardy,  Ralph André
Wolfgang Wagermaier, Biomaterialien, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society;

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Roschger,  Andreas
Wolfgang Wagermaier, Biomaterialien, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society;

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Fratzl,  Peter
Peter Fratzl, Biomaterialien, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society;

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Weinkamer,  Richard
Richard Weinkamer, Biomaterialien, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society;

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Wagermaier,  Wolfgang
Wolfgang Wagermaier, Biomaterialien, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Schemenz, V., Gjardy, R. A., Chamasemani, F., Roschger, A., Roschger, P., Zaslansky, P., et al. (2020). Heterogeneity of the osteocyte lacuno-canalicular network architecture and material characteristics across different tissue types in healing bone. Journal of Structural Biology, 212(2): 107616. doi:10.1016/j.jsb.2020.107616.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-06F2-1
Abstract
Various tissue types, including fibrous connective tissue, bone marrow, cartilage, woven and lamellar bone coexist in healing bone. Similar to all bone tissue type, healing bone contains a lacuno-canalicular network (LCN) housing osteocytes that are known to orchestrate bone remodeling in healthy bone by sensing mechanical strains and translating them into biochemical signals. The structure of the LCN is also hypothesized to influence mineralization processes. Hence, the aim of the present study was to visualize and correlate spatial variations in the LCN topology with mineral characteristics, within and at the interfaces of the different tissue types that comprise healing bone. We applied a correlative multi-method approach to visualize the LCN architecture and quantify mineral particle size and orientation within healing femoral bone in a mouse osteotomy model (26 weeks old C57BL/6 mice). This approach revealed structural differences across several length scales during endochondral ossification within the following regions: calcified cartilage, bony callus, cortical bone and the transition zone between the cortical region and callus that developed during 21 days after the osteotomy. In this transition zone, we observed a continuous convergence of mineral characteristics and osteocyte lacunae shape as well as discontinuities in the lacunae volume and LCN connectivity. The bony callus exhibits a 34% higher lacunae number density with 40% larger lacunar volume compared to cortical bone. The presented correlations between LCN architecture and mineral characteristics improves our understanding of how bone develops during healing and may indicate a contribution of osteocytes to bone (re)modeling.