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Journal Article

Language continuity despite population replacement in Remote Oceania

MPS-Authors
/persons/resource/persons188736

Posth,  Cosimo
Archaeogenetics, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons207357

Nägele,  Kathrin
Archaeogenetics, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons217773

Colleran,  Heidi
Linguistic and Cultural Evolution, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons217778

Bedford,  Stuart
Linguistic and Cultural Evolution, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons217782

Kami,  Kaitip W.
Linguistic and Cultural Evolution, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons215279

Kinaston,  Rebecca
Archaeogenetics, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons201840

Walworth,  Mary
Linguistic and Cultural Evolution, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons205500

Zech,  Jana
Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons198648

Roberts,  Patrick
Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons205106

Jeong,  Choongwon
Archaeogenetics, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons138255

Gray,  Russell D.
Linguistic and Cultural Evolution, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons72801

Krause,  Johannes
Archaeogenetics, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;

/persons/resource/persons188729

Powell,  Adam
Linguistic and Cultural Evolution, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;
Archaeogenetics, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society;
ERC - Waves, Department of Human Behavior Ecology and Culture, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Posth, C., Nägele, K., Colleran, H., Valentin, F., Bedford, S., Kami, K. W., et al. (2018). Language continuity despite population replacement in Remote Oceania. Nature Ecology & Evolution, 2(4), 731-740. doi:10.1038/s41559-018-0498-2.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-1A2A-E
Abstract
Recent genomic analyses show that the earliest peoples reaching Remote Oceania—associated with Austronesian-speaking Lapita culture—were almost completely East Asian, without detectable Papuan ancestry. However, Papuan-related genetic ancestry is found across present-day Pacific populations, indicating that peoples from Near Oceania have played a significant, but largely unknown, ancestral role. Here, new genome-wide data from 19 ancient South Pacific individuals provide direct evidence of a so-far undescribed Papuan expansion into Remote Oceania starting ~2,500 yr bp, far earlier than previously estimated and supporting a model from historical linguistics. New genome-wide data from 27 contemporary ni-Vanuatu demonstrate a subsequent and almost complete replacement of Lapita-Austronesian by Near Oceanian ancestry. Despite this massive demographic change, incoming Papuan languages did not replace Austronesian languages. Population replacement with language continuity is extremely rare—if not unprecedented—in human history. Our analyses show that rather than one large-scale event, the process was incremental and complex, with repeated migrations and sex-biased admixture with peoples from the Bismarck Archipelago.