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Influence of ovarian hormones on value-based decision-making systems: Contribution to sexual dimorphisms in mental disorders

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Lewis,  Carolin Annette
Department for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Eberhard Karls University Tübingen, Germany;
Minerva Research Group EGG (Emotion & neuroimaGinG) Lab, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;
International Max Planck Research School on Neuroscience of Communication: Function, Structure, and Plasticity, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Ambrase, A., Lewis, C. A., Barth, C., & Derntl, B. (2021). Influence of ovarian hormones on value-based decision-making systems: Contribution to sexual dimorphisms in mental disorders. Frontiers in Neuroendocrinology, 60: 100873. doi:10.1016/j.yfrne.2020.100873.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0007-1F9C-8
Abstract
Women and men exhibit differences in behavior when making value-based decisions. Various hypotheses have been proposed to explain these findings, stressing differences in functional lateralization of the brain, functional activation, neurotransmitter involvement and more recently, sex hormones. While a significant interaction of neurotransmitter systems and sex hormones has been shown for both sexes, decision-making in women might be particularly affected by variations of ovarian hormones. In this review we have gathered information from animal and human studies on how ovarian hormones affect decision-making processes in females by interacting with neurotransmitter systems at functionally relevant brain locations and thus modify the computation of decision aspects. We also review previous findings on impaired decision-making in animals and clinical populations with substance use disorder and depression, emphasizing how little we know about the role of ovarian hormones in aberrant decision-making.